Whom vs. Whose: How to Use Whom and Whose in a Sentence

Are you an English learner struggling with the proper use of “whom” and “whose”? You’re not alone! These two words are often confused, even by native English speakers. But fear not, we’re here to help clarify the difference between the two and provide you with some examples to help you better understand their usage.

In this article, we’ll explore the proper usage of “whom” and “whose” in different contexts and provide you with some tips to help you remember which one to use. By the end of this article, you’ll have a better understanding of these two words and be able to use them with confidence in your writing and conversation. So, let’s dive in!

Whom vs. Whose

Whom vs. Whose: How to Use Whom and Whose in a Sentence

Whom and whose are pronouns that can be confusing to use in sentences because they have specific grammatical roles. Here are some key points to remember about these pronouns:

  • Whom is the objective form of the pronoun “who.” It is used to refer to the object of a verb or preposition.
  • Whose is the possessive form of “who.” It is used to show ownership or possession.
  • Who is the subjective form of the pronoun, and is used as the subject of a verb.
  • If you are unsure whether to use whom or who, try replacing the word with “he,” “she,” or “they” to see if it makes sense in the sentence. If it does, you should use whom.

How to Use Whom vs. Whose

How to Use Whom

Whom is an object pronoun like “him, her, us”,… We use WHOM to ask which person receives an action.

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To use whom correctly in a sentence, you can think of it as the object of a verb or preposition.

Here are some examples of “whom” used as the object of a verb:

  • Whom did you see at the store?

The pronoun “whom” is the object of the verb “see.”

  • Whom do you think will be elected president?

The pronoun “whom” is the object of the verb “think.”

Here are some examples of “whom” used as the object of a preposition:

  • To whom did she send the book?

The pronoun “whom” is the object of the preposition “to.”

  • For whom is the gift intended?

The pronoun “whom” is the object of the preposition “for.”

Remember, “whom” is used as the object of a verb or preposition, not as the subject of a verb. If you are unsure whether to use “whom” or “who,” try replacing the word with “he,” “she,” or “they” to see if it makes sense in the sentence. If it does, you should use “whom.”

How to Use Whose

To use whose correctly in a sentence, you can think of it as a possessive pronoun that shows ownership or possession. Here are some examples of “whose” used to show possession:

  • Whose keys are on the kitchen counter?

The pronoun “whose” shows possession of the keys.

  • Whose idea was it to go on a hike?

The pronoun “whose” shows possession of the idea.

You can also use “whose” to ask about possession or ownership. For example:

  • Whose car is parked in front of the house?
  • Whose turn is it to do the dishes?

Remember, “whose” is used to show possession, not as the subject of a verb. If you are unsure whether to use “whose” or “who,” try replacing the word with “his,” “hers,” or “theirs” to see if it makes sense in the sentence. If it does, you should use “whose.”

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In summary, whom as the object of a verb or preposition, and use whose to show possession.

Examples in Sentences

Now that we understand the difference between “Whom” and “Whose,” let’s take a look at some examples to see how they are used in sentences.

Using “Whom”

  • “Whom did you invite to the party?”
  • “To whom should I address this letter?”
  • “This is the man whom I saw at the store.”

In each of these examples, “Whom” is used as an object pronoun. It is used to refer to the person who receives the action of the verb or preposition.

Using “Whose”

  • “Whose book is this?”
  • “Whose car did you borrow?”
  • “Whose turn is it to clean the kitchen?”

In these examples, “Whose” is used as a possessive adjective. It is used to show ownership or to ask about the owner of something.

Interactive Exercises

Now that we have a good understanding of whom vs. whose, let’s put our knowledge to the test with some interactive exercises. These exercises will help you practice using the correct word in different contexts.

Exercise 1: Who or Whom?

In this exercise, you will be given a sentence and asked to choose between “who” or “whom”. Remember, “who” is used as a subject pronoun, while “whom” is used as an object pronoun.

Example: ___ did you invite to the party?

A) Who B) Whom

Answer: A) Who

Exercise 2: Whose or Who’s?

In this exercise, you will be given a sentence and asked to choose between “whose” or “who’s”. “Whose” is a possessive pronoun, while “who’s” is a contraction of “who is” or “who has”.

Example: ___ car is parked in the driveway?

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A) Whose B) Who’s

Answer: A) Whose

Exercise 3: Fill in the Blank

In this exercise, you will be given a sentence with a blank space, and you will need to fill in the blank with either “whom” or “whose”.

Example: ___ book is this?

Answer: Whose

Exercise 4: Identify the Error

In this exercise, you will be given a sentence with an error, and you will need to identify the error and correct it.

Example: Whom is going to the store?

Error: Incorrect use of “whom”

Correction: Who is going to the store?

Frequently Asked Questions

When do I use ‘who’ and when do I use ‘whom’?

‘Who’ is used as a subject of a sentence, while ‘whom’ is used as an object. To determine which one to use, you can try replacing the word with ‘he’ or ‘she’ for ‘who’ and ‘him’ or ‘her’ for ‘whom’. If the sentence still makes sense, use ‘who’. If it doesn’t, use ‘whom’.

What is the difference between ‘who’ and ‘whom’?

The main difference between ‘who’ and ‘whom’ is that ‘who’ is used as the subject of a sentence, while ‘whom’ is used as an object. ‘Who’ can also be used to refer to a group of people, while ‘whom’ is only used to refer to an individual.

How do I know when to use ‘whose’?

‘Whose’ is used to show possession. It is used to ask who owns or has something. For example, “Whose book is this?”

Can you give an example of a sentence using ‘whose’?

Sure, here’s an example: “Whose car is parked outside?”

Is it grammatically correct to say ‘attention to who’ or ‘attention to whom’?

It is grammatically correct to say ‘attention to whom’ because ‘whom’ is the object of the preposition ‘to’. However, in informal conversation, it is common to use ‘who’ instead of ‘whom’.

Last Updated on November 8, 2023

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