Conditional Conjunctions: How to Use Conditional Conjunctions in Sentences

Conditional conjunctions are words that connect clauses or phrases in a sentence and indicate that one clause or phrase depends on the other clause or phrase. They are used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and they help to show the relationship between the two clauses or phrases. In this lesson, we will review the most common conditional conjunctions in spoken and written English.

Conditional Conjunctions

What Are Conditional Conjunctions?

Conditional conjunctions are words that connect clauses or phrases in a sentence and indicate that one clause or phrase depends on the other clause or phrase. They are used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and they help to show the relationship between the two clauses or phrases. Conditional conjunctions are often used to express conditional statements, which are statements that describe a situation that depends on something else happening or being true. Here are some examples of conditional conjunctions:

Conditional Conjunctions

  • if
  • even if
  • only if
  • unless
  • as long as
  • provided that
  • in case

Conditional Conjunctions in Sentences

Here are some examples of how these conjunctions can be used:

  • If you warm ice, it will melt into water. (In this sentence, the clause “it will melt into water” depends on the clause “you warm ice.”)
  • Unless you push your claim, you will not get satisfaction. (In this sentence, the clause “you will not get satisfaction” depends on the clause “push your claim.”)
  • As long as you are still alive, you will definitely encounter the good things in life. (In this sentence, the clause “you will definitely encounter the good things in life” depends on the clause “you are still alive.”)
  • Provided that you have the money in your account, you can withdraw up to £100 a day. (In this sentence, the clause “you can withdraw up to £100 a day” depends on the clause “you have the money in your account.”)
  • In case you should need any help, here’s my number. (In this sentence, the clause “here’s my number” depends on the clause “you should need any help.”)

How to Use Conditional Conjunctions

Unless

Unless is a conditional conjunction that means “if not.” It is used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and it shows that the condition must be met in order for something else to happen. For example:

  • Unless you eat your vegetables, you can’t have dessert.
  • I won’t be able to come to the party unless I finish my homework.

In these examples, the outcome described in the second clause (“you can’t have dessert” and “I won’t be able to come to the party”) will only happen if the condition described in the first clause (“you eat your vegetables” and “I finish my homework”) is not met.

Related  Either Or: How to Use Either Or in a Sentence

If

If is a conditional conjunction that is used to introduce a condition in a sentence. It shows that the condition must be met in order for something else to happen. For example:

  • If you do your homework, you’ll get a good grade.
  • If it rains, we’ll stay inside.

In these examples, the outcome described in the second clause (“you’ll get a good grade” and “we’ll stay inside”) will only happen if the condition described in the first clause (“you do your homework” and “it rains”) is met.

Even If

Even if is a phrase that is used to introduce a condition that is unlikely to be met, but which the speaker is considering as a possibility. It is often used to show that the speaker is making a statement that is true or will happen regardless of the likelihood of the condition being met. For example:

  • I’ll still love you even if you don’t love me.
  • I’ll go to the concert even if it rains.

Even if is similar to if, but it adds emphasis to the condition and suggests that the speaker is considering a possibility that is unlikely to occur.

Only If

Only if means “if and only if.” It is used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and it shows that the condition is necessary in order for something else to happen. Only if is similar to if, but it adds emphasis to the condition and suggests that it is the only way that the outcome described in the first clause can happen. For example:

  • You can borrow my car only if you promise to take good care of it.
  • I’ll help you with your homework only if you promise to study for your exams.

In these examples, the outcome described in the first clause (“you can borrow my car” and “I’ll help you with your homework”) will only happen if the condition described in the second clause (“you promise to take good care of it” and “you promise to study for your exams”) is met.

Related  Conjunction Words: How to Use Both and - Either or - Neither nor in Sentences

In Case

In case is a conjunction that means “in the event that.” It is used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and it shows that the condition may or may not happen, but that the speaker is prepared for it in the event that it does. In case is used to describe a contingency plan or a precautionary measure. For example:

  • I brought an umbrella in case it rains.
  • I left a note for my roommate in case she comes home before I do.

In case is similar to if, but it suggests that the condition is less likely to occur and that the speaker is taking precautions in the event that it does.

Provided, As Long As/ So

Provided means “on the condition that.” It is used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and it shows that the condition must be met in order for something else to happen. For example:

  • You can borrow my car provided that you have your driver’s license.
  • I’ll help you with your homework provided that you promise to study for your exams.

In these examples, the outcome described in the first clause (“you can borrow my car” and “I’ll help you with your homework”) will only happen if the condition described in the second clause (“you have your driver’s license” and “you promise to study for your exams”) is met.

As long as means “as long as the condition described is true.” It is used to introduce a condition in a sentence, and it shows that the condition must be met in order for something else to happen. For example:

  • You can borrow my car as long as you return it on time.
  • As long as you are careful, you won’t get hurt.

In these examples, the outcome described in the first clause (“you can borrow my car” and “you won’t get hurt”) will continue to be true as long as the condition described in the second clause (“you return it on time” and “you are careful”) remains true.

Related  Subordinating Conjunctions: Useful Subordinating Conjunctions and Examples

Conditional conjunctions can be used to express a wide range of conditions and relationships between clauses or phrases, and they can be used to express different degrees of likelihood or certainty. Understanding how to use conditional conjunctions correctly can help you to express complex ideas and conditional relationships in your writing and speaking.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some examples of conditional sentences?

Conditional sentences are sentences that express a condition and its result. Some examples of conditional sentences include: “If it rains, we will stay inside”, “Provided that you finish your homework, you can watch TV”, “Unless you study hard, you will fail the exam”, and “Supposing you win the lottery, what would you do?”.

What are some common conditional connectives?

Common conditional connectives include “if”, “provided that”, “so long as”, “as long as”, “unless”, “supposing”, “on condition that”, and “whether or not”. These connectives are used to express a condition that must be met for the result to occur.

How do you use conditional conjunctions in writing?

To use conditional conjunctions in writing, you must first identify the condition and the result. Then, you can use a conditional conjunction to connect the two parts of the sentence. For example, “If it rains, we will stay inside” or “Provided that you finish your homework, you can watch TV”.

What is the difference between a conditional conjunction and a regular conjunction?

A conditional conjunction is used to express a condition and its result, while a regular conjunction is used to connect two independent clauses. For example, “I like coffee and tea” is a sentence with a regular conjunction, while “If it rains, I will stay inside” is a sentence with a conditional conjunction.

What are some common words used in conditional statements?

Some common words used in conditional statements include “if”, “unless”, “provided that”, “as long as”, “supposing”, and “on condition that”.

How do you identify conditional sentences in a text?

To identify a conditional sentence in a text, look for a sentence that expresses a condition and its result. The sentence will usually contain a conditional conjunction, such as “if”, “provided that”, or “unless”.

Last Updated on November 7, 2023

Leave a Comment

486