Useful Temperature Vocabulary: How to Express Temperature in English

In this article, we’ll cover a range of temperature-related words and phrases that you can use in a variety of situations. We’ll start with some basic vocabulary to describe temperature, such as hot, cold, warm, and cool. From there, we’ll move on to more specific terms like boiling, freezing, and mild.

We’ll also discuss how to use these words in context and provide examples of common idioms and expressions related to temperature. Whether you’re looking to improve your English skills or simply want to be able to talk about the weather more confidently, this guide has you covered.

Temperature Vocabulary

Temperature Vocabulary

Temperature Vocabulary Words

Here is a list showing temperature vocabulary.

  • Cold: low temperature
  • Hot: high temperature
  • Warm: slightly hot, especially in a pleasant way
  • Cool: slightly cold in a pleasant way
  • Chill: cold
  • Freezing: extremely cold
  • Mild/ Moderate/ Temperate: neither very hot nor very cold
  • Boiling/ Scorching: very hot, often used in negative/ positive contexts
  • Humid: hot and damp. It makes you sweat a lot
  • Muggy: warm and damp in an unpleasant way
  • Stifling: hot and you can hardly breath
  • Sweltering: hot and uncomfortable

Expressing Temperature

  • It’s 35 below zero.
  • It is very hot outside. It is about forty-two degrees.
  • It is over 25oC.
  • The thermometer showed a temperature of –38°C last night!
  • It is very cold today. It is about one degree above zero.
  • It is 5 below.
  • It’s 30 degrees Celsius.
  • It’s a maximum of 45°F in the morning.
  • The temperature inside is plus 10 degrees.
  • The temperature outside is minus twenty degrees.
  • It’s 20 degrees Fahrenheit.
  • It’s two degrees above zero.
  • The temperature reached 36°C.
  • Water boils at 212°F. (at 212 degrees Fahrenheit) or Water boils at 100 °C (at 100 degrees Celsius (centigrade)).

Basic Temperature Terms

These terms will help you express the temperature accurately and effectively in various situations.

One of the most common ways to express temperature is by using degrees Fahrenheit or degrees Celsius. Fahrenheit is used in the United States, while Celsius is used in the rest of the world. You can use the following formulas to convert between the two scales:

  • To convert from Fahrenheit to Celsius: (°F – 32) x 5/9 = °C
  • To convert from Celsius to Fahrenheit: (°C x 9/5) + 32 = °F
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Now let’s take a look at some basic temperature terms:

  • Cold: a temperature that is significantly below the average or normal temperature. For example, “It’s cold outside today. The temperature is only 10 degrees Celsius.”
  • Chilly: a temperature that is cool but not extremely cold. For example, “It’s a bit chilly in here. Can we turn up the heat?”
  • Mild: a temperature that is neither very hot nor very cold. For example, “The weather is mild today. It’s perfect for a picnic.”
  • Warm: a temperature that is comfortable and pleasant. For example, “It’s warm outside today. Let’s go for a walk.”
  • Hot: a temperature that is significantly above the average or normal temperature. For example, “It’s hot in here. Can we turn on the air conditioning?”

Describing High Temperatures

Here are some useful vocabulary words and phrases to help you express high temperatures in English.

Heatwave Terminology

A heatwave is a prolonged period of excessively hot weather, which may be accompanied by high humidity. Here are some words and phrases you can use to describe a heatwave:

  • Sweltering: extremely hot and uncomfortable
  • Scorching: very hot, especially in a dry environment
  • Boiling: extremely hot, often used in negative contexts
  • Blistering: extremely hot and sunny
  • Sizzling: very hot, especially when referring to the weather or food

Fire-Related Vocabulary

High temperatures can also be associated with fires. Here are some words and phrases that are related to fires and high temperatures:

  • Inferno: a large, intense fire
  • Blaze: a large, bright fire
  • Wildfire: an uncontrolled fire that spreads quickly in natural areas
  • Conflagration: a large, destructive fire that spreads over a wide area
  • Combustion: the process of burning

It’s important to note that while these words and phrases can be used to describe high temperatures, they may also have other meanings in different contexts. Use them appropriately and with caution.

Describing Low Temperatures

When it comes to describing low temperatures, there are several winter weather terms and ice-related vocabulary that can come in handy. Here are some of the most useful ones:

Winter Weather Terms

  • Cold: This is a general term used to describe a low temperature. It can be used to describe a variety of temperatures, from slightly chilly to extremely frigid.
  • Freezing: This term is used to describe temperatures at or below the freezing point of water (32°F or 0°C). It can also be used to describe the process of water turning into ice.
  • Chilly: This term is used to describe temperatures that are slightly cold, but not quite freezing. It is often used to describe weather that is cool enough to require a light jacket or sweater.
  • Frosty: This term is used to describe weather that is cold enough to cause frost to form on surfaces, such as windows or grass.
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Ice-Related Vocabulary

  • Icy: This term is used to describe surfaces that are covered in ice. It can also be used to describe weather conditions that are conducive to the formation of ice.
  • Glacial: This term is used to describe temperatures that are extremely cold, like those found in the polar regions.
  • Snowy: This term is used to describe weather conditions that involve snowfall. It can also be used to describe surfaces that are covered in snow.
  • Slushy: This term is used to describe surfaces that are covered in a mixture of snow and water, often found on roads and sidewalks after a snowstorm.

Idiomatic Expressions Related to Temperature

As we have seen earlier, there are several ways to express temperature in English. However, there are also several idiomatic expressions related to temperature that are commonly used in English. Here are some of the most common ones:

  • Cold as ice: This expression is used to describe something or someone that is extremely cold or unfeeling. For example, “Her heart was as cold as ice.”
  • Hot under the collar: This expression is used to describe someone who is angry or upset. For example, “He was hot under the collar when he found out he didn’t get the job.”
  • Warm welcome: This expression is used to describe a friendly greeting or reception. For example, “We received a warm welcome when we arrived at the hotel.”
  • Cool as a cucumber: This expression is used to describe someone who is calm and composed, especially in a stressful situation. For example, “She remained cool as a cucumber during the interview.”
  • In hot water: This expression is used to describe someone who is in trouble or facing a difficult situation. For example, “He’s in hot water with his boss for missing the deadline.”
  • Heat of the moment: This expression is used to describe a decision or action made impulsively, without careful consideration. For example, “I regret what I said in the heat of the moment.”
  • Chill out: This expression is used to tell someone to relax or calm down. For example, “Chill out, everything will be okay.”
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Frequently Asked Questions

What are some common temperature-related terms in English?

Some common temperature-related terms in English include hot, warm, cool, cold, freezing, and boiling. You can also use degrees Celsius or Fahrenheit to express temperature.

What is the difference between Celsius and Fahrenheit?

Celsius and Fahrenheit are two different temperature scales. Celsius is used in most countries and is based on the freezing and boiling points of water, where 0°C is the freezing point and 100°C is the boiling point. Fahrenheit is used in the United States and some other countries and is based on a different scale. The freezing point of water is 32°F and the boiling point is 212°F.

How do you convert Celsius to Fahrenheit?

To convert Celsius to Fahrenheit, you can use the following formula: F = (C x 1.8) + 32. For example, if the temperature is 20°C, you can convert it to Fahrenheit by multiplying 20 by 1.8, which equals 36, and then adding 32, which equals 68°F.

What is the boiling point of water in Fahrenheit and Celsius?

The boiling point of water is 100°C or 212°F.

What is the freezing point of water in Fahrenheit and Celsius?

The freezing point of water is 0°C or 32°F.

How do you express temperature in English for weather and climate?

To express temperature in English for weather and climate, you can use phrases such as “It’s hot today,” “It’s chilly outside,” or “It’s freezing cold.” You can also use specific temperatures, such as “It’s 25 degrees Celsius” or “It’s 70 degrees Fahrenheit.”

Learn more about Rainy Weather and Snowy Weather.

Last Updated on November 14, 2023

6 thoughts on “Useful Temperature Vocabulary: How to Express Temperature in English”

  1. The Fahrenheit side of the thermometer needs a little bit of re-calibration work. I know very few people who would call 40° F sweltering.

    Reply
    • How do you know that you are right about your own theory? And also you shouldn’t use your real life name on the internet GENE. But remember I don’t care?!

      Reply
  2. Your Fahrenheit scale is completely wrong, please fix the graphic. 0C is 32F, but your scale shows 10F. Also the notches are not the same size, 10 C tick-marks should face 18 F tick marks.

    Reply

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