Subordinating Conjunctions: Useful Subordinating Conjunctions and Examples

Subordinating conjunctions are a vital component of complex sentences. These words and phrases connect dependent clauses to independent clauses, indicating that the dependent clause has an informative value to add to the sentence’s main idea. They are used to signal a cause-and-effect relationship or a shift in time and place between the two clauses. Without subordinating conjunctions, sentences would be much shorter and simpler, lacking the complexity and nuance that subordinating conjunctions add.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are words or phrases that are used to join a dependent clause to an independent clause. They are also known as subordinate conjunctions or subordinators. Subordinating conjunctions signal a relationship between the two clauses, such as a cause-and-effect relationship or a shift in time and place.

Subordinating Conjunctions

Some common subordinating conjunctions include “because,” “although,” “since,” “if,” “when,” “while,” and “until.” These words are used to introduce a dependent clause and connect it to an independent clause.

Subordinating conjunctions are used to create complex sentences, which are sentences that contain an independent clause and at least one dependent clause. The dependent clause cannot stand alone as a complete sentence and relies on the independent clause for meaning.

  • After
  • Although
  • As
  • As if
  • As long as
  • As much as
  • As soon as
  • As though
  • Because
  • Before
  • Even if
  • Even though
  • How
  • If
  • Inasmuch as
  • In order that
  • Now that
  • Provided
  • Since
  • So that
  • Than
  • That
  • Though
  • Till
  • Unless
  • Until
  • When
  • Whenever
  • Where
  • Wherever
  • While
  • Than
  • Who
  • Whoever
  • Once

Here are some examples of how subordinating conjunctions can be used in sentences:

  • Because it was raining, you decided to stay inside.
  • Although she was tired, she continued to work on her project.
  • Since you are already here, you might as well stay for dinner.
  • If you study hard, you will pass the exam.
  • When the sun sets, the sky turns orange and pink.

It is important to use subordinating conjunctions correctly to ensure that the sentence makes sense and conveys the intended meaning. When using a subordinating conjunction, make sure that the dependent clause makes sense in context and relates to the independent clause.

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Types of Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are words that are used to join a subordinate clause to a main clause, creating a complex sentence. There are several types of subordinating conjunctions, each with its own function.

Time

Subordinating conjunctions that indicate time are used to show when an action or event takes place. Some examples of time-subordinating conjunctions are:

  • After
  • Before
  • Since
  • Until
  • When
  • While

For example: “You can go outside after you finish your homework.”

Place

Subordinating conjunctions that indicate place are used to show where an action or event takes place. Some examples of place subordinating conjunctions are:

  • Where
  • Wherever

For example: “You can sit wherever you like in the classroom.”

Cause

Subordinating conjunctions that indicate cause are used to show why an action or event takes place. Some examples of cause subordinating conjunctions are:

  • Because
  • Since

For example: “You should wear a coat because it’s cold outside.”

Condition

Subordinating conjunctions that indicate condition are used to show under what circumstances an action or event takes place. Some examples of condition subordinating conjunctions are:

  • If
  • Unless

For example: “If you study hard, you will pass the exam.”

Comparison

Subordinating conjunctions that indicate comparison are used to show how two things are similar or different. Some examples of comparison subordinating conjunctions are:

  • As
  • Than

For example: “She is as smart as her sister.”

Contrast

Subordinating conjunctions that indicate contrast are used to show how two things are different. Some examples of contrast subordinating conjunctions are:

  • Although
  • Even though
  • Whereas

For example: “Although it was raining, we went to the park.”

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Examples of Subordinating Conjunctions

Subordinating conjunctions are words that connect a dependent clause to an independent clause, creating a complex sentence. These conjunctions help to show the relationship between the two clauses, indicating a cause-effect, time, or condition relationship, among others. Here are some examples of subordinating conjunctions:

  • Time: after, before, since, until, when, whenever, while
  • Cause: because, since, as, so that
  • Condition: if, unless, provided that, even if, in case, whether or not
  • Comparison: as, than, rather than, like
  • Concession: although, even though, though, while
  • Place: where, wherever

For instance, “After I finish my work, I will go to the gym” is an example of a sentence that uses the subordinating conjunction “after” to show a time relationship between the dependent clause “I finish my work” and the independent clause “I will go to the gym.”

Another example is “Because it was raining, we decided to stay indoors,” where the subordinating conjunction “because” shows a cause-effect relationship between the dependent clause “it was raining” and the independent clause “we decided to stay indoors.”

In addition, “If you study hard, you will pass the test” is an example of a sentence that uses the subordinating conjunction “if” to show a condition relationship between the dependent clause “you study hard” and the independent clause “you will pass the test.”

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the difference between coordinating and subordinating conjunctions?

Coordinating conjunctions join two independent clauses, while subordinating conjunctions join a dependent clause to an independent clause. Coordinating conjunctions include words like “and,” “but,” and “or,” while subordinating conjunctions include words like “although,” “because,” and “if.”

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What are some examples of subordinating conjunctions?

Some common examples of subordinating conjunctions include “after,” “although,” “as,” “because,” “before,” “if,” “since,” “though,” “unless,” “until,” “when,” and “while.”

What are the uses of subordinating conjunctions?

Subordinating conjunctions are used to join a dependent clause to an independent clause, creating a complex sentence. They can also be used to show cause and effect, contrast, time, or condition.

How do subordinating clauses function in a sentence?

Subordinating clauses function as dependent clauses in a sentence. They cannot stand alone as a sentence because they do not express a complete thought. Instead, they rely on the independent clause to make sense.

What are the 12 subordinating conjunctions and their meanings?

The 12 subordinating conjunctions are “after,” “although,” “as,” “because,” “before,” “if,” “since,” “than,” “that,” “though,” “unless,” and “while.” Each conjunction has its own specific meaning and usage.

What are the 10 most common subordinating conjunctions used in English?

The 10 most common subordinating conjunctions used in English are “although,” “as,” “because,” “before,” “if,” “since,” “that,” “though,” “unless,” and “while.” These conjunctions are used frequently in both spoken and written English.

Related terms:

Last Updated on November 7, 2023

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