Irregular Adverbs: List of 10 Useful Irregular Adverbs in English

Have you ever heard of irregular adverbs? If you’re an English learner, chances are you’ve come across them before. Irregular adverbs are adverbs that don’t follow standard English spelling conventions. They can be tricky to use since they don’t follow the usual rules, but they’re an important part of the English language that you’ll need to master.

In this article, we’ll be discussing irregular adverbs in detail. We’ll start by defining what they are and how they differ from regular adverbs. We’ll also provide a list of common irregular adverbs and their adjectival counterparts. By the end of this article, you’ll have a better understanding of irregular adverbs and how to use them correctly in your writing and speech. So, let’s dive in!

Irregular Adverbs

In English, adverbs usually end in “-ly” and are formed by adding this suffix to the corresponding adjective. However, there are some adverbs that do not follow this rule and are called irregular adverbs.

Irregular Adverbs

Learning irregular adverbs is important because they are commonly used in English and can significantly change the meaning of a sentence. Here are some examples of irregular adverbs and their corresponding adjectives:

  • well (adjective: good)
  • fast (adjective: quick)
  • hard (adjective: difficult)
  • late (adjective: tardy)

Unlike regular adverbs, irregular adverbs do not have a specific suffix or pattern to follow. Therefore, it is important to memorize them individually.

Here are some common irregular adverbs in English:

Irregular Adverb Adjective
well good
fast quick
hard difficult
late tardy

Irregular adverbs can be used to modify verbs, adjectives, or other adverbs. For example:

  • He speaks English well.
  • She runs fast.
  • They worked hard all day.
  • The train arrived late.
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It is important to note that some adjectives have the same form as their corresponding adverbs. For example, “fast” is both an adjective and an adverb. In these cases, it is important to rely on context to determine the correct part of speech.

Formation of Irregular Adverbs

In English, most adverbs are formed by adding the suffix “-ly” to an adjective. However, there are some adverbs that do not follow this rule and are called irregular adverbs. These adverbs have unique forms that do not necessarily correspond to their adjectival forms.

To form irregular adverbs, there is no set pattern to follow, and they must be memorized. Here are some examples of common irregular adverbs and their corresponding adjectives:

  • fast – quickly
  • good – well
  • hard – hard
  • late – late
  • early – early

It is important to note that irregular adverbs do not always follow the same pattern as their corresponding adjectives. For example, the irregular adverb for the adjective “fast” is “quickly,” not “fastly.”

While irregular adverbs may seem confusing at first, they are an important part of the English language and can greatly enhance one’s ability to communicate effectively. By memorizing these irregular forms, English learners can improve their speaking and writing skills and become more proficient in the language.

Common Examples of Irregular Adverbs

In English, most adverbs follow a simple rule: they are formed by adding “-ly” to the end of an adjective. However, there are some adverbs that don’t follow this rule and are called irregular adverbs. Here are some common examples of irregular adverbs:

  • Good – becomes well
  • Fast – remains the same
  • Hard – remains the same
  • Late – remains the same
  • Early – remains the same
  • Daily – remains the same
  • Straight – remains the same
  • Wrong – can be wrong or wrongly
  • Lively – remains the same
  • Far – remains the same
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As you can see, some adverbs remain the same as their corresponding adjectives, while others change completely. It’s important to learn these irregular adverbs because they are used frequently in English.

For example, instead of saying “I speak English good,” which is incorrect, you should say “I speak English well.” Similarly, instead of saying “He works hardly,” you should say “He works hard.”

It’s worth noting that some adverbs can be both regular and irregular, depending on the context. For example, “wrong” can be used as both a regular adverb (e.g. “He spelled the word wrong”) and an irregular adverb (e.g. “He was wrongly accused of the crime“).

Usage of Irregular Adverbs in Sentences

Irregular adverbs are adverbs that do not follow the normal rule of adding “-ly” to the adjective. Instead, they have a unique form that we need to memorize.

One of the most common irregular adverbs is “well,” which is the adverb form of “good.” For example, we can say “She plays the piano well” instead of “She plays the piano goodly.” Another example is “fast,” which is the adverb form of “fast.” We can say “He drives too fast” instead of “He drives too fastly.”

Irregular adverbs can also be used to modify other adverbs. For instance, we can say “He speaks English very well” instead of “He speaks English very goodly.” In this case, “well” modifies the adverb “very.”

It’s important to note that irregular adverbs can be used in both formal and informal contexts. However, we should avoid using them excessively or incorrectly, as it can make our sentences sound awkward or confusing.

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Frequently Asked Questions

How many irregular adverbs are there in English?

There is no fixed number of irregular adverbs in English. They are formed from adjectives but do not follow the usual rule of adding -ly to the adjective. Instead, they have their own unique form. Some adjectives have more than one irregular adverb form.

What are some examples of irregular adverbs?

Here are some examples of irregular adverbs:

  • good (adjective) → well (adverb)
  • fast (adjective) → fast (adverb)
  • hard (adjective) → hard (adverb)
  • late (adjective) → late (adverb)
  • early (adjective) → early (adverb)

What is the irregular adverb form of ‘good’?

The irregular adverb form of ‘good’ is ‘well’.

Is ‘daily’ considered an irregular adverb?

No, ‘daily’ is not considered an irregular adverb. It is a regular adverb formed by adding -ly to the adjective ‘daily’.

What is the difference between regular and irregular adverbs?

Regular adverbs are formed by adding -ly to the adjective. Irregular adverbs, on the other hand, have their own unique form. While regular adverbs follow a consistent rule, irregular adverbs do not and must be memorized individually.

Last Updated on November 10, 2023

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