Idioms About Nature: 10 Interesting Nature Idioms in English

In this article, we’ll be exploring the fascinating world of idioms about nature. English is a rich language, and it’s no surprise that we have many expressions that are inspired by the natural world around us. From the stars in the sky to the flowers in the ground, we’ll be covering it all.

Nature Idioms

Nature idioms are expressions that use elements of nature to describe a situation or convey a message. They are commonly used in English and add color and depth to our language.

Nature idioms can be used to describe various situations, such as unexpected events, small amounts, and refreshing ideas. For example, the idiom “a bolt from the blue” refers to a sudden and unexpected event or news. Another common idiom is “a drop in the ocean,” which means a very small or insignificant amount in comparison to what is needed or expected.

Nature idioms can also be used to describe people or things. For instance, someone who brings happiness and positivity to others can be described as “a ray of sunshine.” On the other hand, something that is against nature is considered evil, unnatural, or immoral.

Using natural idioms in conversation can make your speech more creative and engaging. They can also help you express yourself more effectively and add a touch of humor to your language. However, it’s important to use them appropriately and in the right context to avoid confusion or misunderstanding.

Common Idioms about Nature

Idioms About Nature

There are many English idioms based on Nature. Here are 10 Nature Idioms with their meanings.

1. A shrinking violet

Meaning:  A shy person

2. On cloud nine

Meaning: Very happy

3. Cuts no ice

Meaning: Doesn’t have any effect or influence

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4. Calm before the storm

Meaning: Unusual or false quiet period before a period of upheaval

5. Stealing my thunder

Meaning: Making people pay attention to you

6. In the air

Meaning: Happening or about to happen

7. Many moons ago

Meaning: A very long time ago

8. A ray of sunshine

Meaning: Something that brings happiness to someone

9. Once in a blue moon (Learn more about Color Idioms)

Meaning: Very rarely

10. Out of the woods

Meaning: Out of danger

Idioms About Weather

Nature Idioms

Idioms About Plants and Trees

While weather idioms are often associated with the sky and the elements, they can also be used to describe the natural world around us. Here are a few idioms about plants and trees:

  • As right as rain: If something is “as right as rain,” it means it’s perfect or in excellent condition. This idiom likely comes from the idea that rain is necessary for plants to grow and thrive.
  • To be in full bloom: When a plant or tree is in full bloom, it means it’s at the peak of its flowering season and looks its best. This idiom can also be used metaphorically to describe a person or thing that is flourishing.

Idioms About Animals

Just like plants and trees, animals can also be used in weather idioms. Here are a few examples:

  • To rain cats and dogs: This is one of the most well-known weather idioms, and it means to rain very heavily. The origin of this idiom is unclear, but it’s thought to have been used as early as the 17th century.
  • To have a whale of a time: While not strictly a weather idiom, this phrase uses the image of a whale to describe having a great time. It’s often used in the context of vacation or leisure activities.

Idioms About Earth and Sky

Of course, weather idioms are most commonly associated with the sky and the elements. Here are a few examples:

  • To be on cloud nine: If someone is “on cloud nine,” it means they’re extremely happy or excited. This idiom likely comes from the idea that clouds are high up in the sky and therefore represent a lofty, elevated feeling.
  • To weather the storm: When someone “weathers the storm,” it means they’ve successfully navigated a difficult situation. This idiom likely comes from the idea of a ship surviving a storm at sea.
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Idioms About Water Bodies

Water is another common theme in weather idioms. Here are a few examples:

  • To be under the weather: While this idiom technically refers to feeling sick, its origin is actually nautical. “Under the weather” originally meant being on the side of the ship that was getting hit by the wind and waves, which was often a miserable experience.
  • To make waves: If someone is “making waves,” it means they’re causing trouble or disrupting the status quo. This idiom likely comes from the idea of waves being disruptive and unpredictable.

Idioms About Seasons

Finally, we have idioms about the seasons. Here are a few examples:

  • To be a spring chicken: If someone is a “spring chicken,” it means they’re young and inexperienced. This idiom likely comes from the idea of spring being a time of renewal and growth.
  • To be snowed under: When someone is “snowed under,” it means they’re overwhelmed with work or responsibilities. This idiom likely comes from the idea of being buried under a heavy snowfall.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some idioms related to the great outdoors?

When it comes to the great outdoors, there are plenty of idioms to choose from. Some of the most popular ones include “take a hike,” “hit the trail,” and “get back to nature.” These idioms all encourage people to spend time outside and enjoy all that nature has to offer.

What are some animal idioms that relate to nature?

Animals play a big role in nature, so it’s no surprise that there are many animal idioms that relate to the natural world. Some examples include “busy as a bee,” “sly as a fox,” and “strong as an ox.” These idioms use animal characteristics to describe people or situations in nature.

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What are some idioms that use music to describe nature?

Music and nature have a lot in common, and there are many idioms that use music to describe the natural world. Some examples include “the birds are singing,” “the wind is howling,” and “the leaves are rustling.” These idioms use musical language to help people visualize and understand the sounds of nature.

What are some idioms about the environment?

The environment is a complex and important part of nature, and there are many idioms that relate to it. Some examples include “reduce, reuse, recycle,” “leave no trace,” and “carbon footprint.” These idioms encourage people to take care of the environment and make sustainable choices.

What are some idioms that describe the beauty of nature?

Nature is full of beauty, and there are many idioms that describe it. Some examples include “a sight for sore eyes,” “a breath of fresh air,” and “a picture-perfect view.” These idioms use language to help people appreciate the beauty of nature.

What are some idioms that relate to forests or trees?

Forests and trees are an important part of nature, and there are many idioms that relate to them. Some examples include “can’t see the forest for the trees,” “money doesn’t grow on trees,” and “put down roots.” These idioms use forest and tree imagery to describe situations and experiences in life.

Last Updated on November 10, 2023

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