Commonly Misspelled Words: How to Spell them Correctly?

Are you tired of misspelling words? Do you find yourself constantly relying on autocorrect to fix your mistakes? We’ve all been there. English is a complex language with many words that are commonly misspelled. In this article, we’ll cover some of the most commonly misspelled words and provide tips on how to avoid these errors.

Spelling Mistakes

Commonly Misspelled Words

Phonetics

English spelling can be notoriously tricky, with many words pronounced differently than they are spelled. This can lead to confusion when trying to spell a word based on how it sounds. For example, the word “receipt” is pronounced as “ri-seet,” but it can be easy to misspell it as “reciept” or “receit.”

Homophones

Homophones are words that sound the same but have different meanings and spellings. For example, “there,” “their,” and “they’re” all sound the same but are spelled differently. Confusing these words can lead to spelling mistakes, such as writing “they’re” instead of “their.”

Confusing Letters

Some letters in the English language can be easily confused, leading to spelling mistakes. For example, “i” and “e” are commonly switched in words such as “believe” and “receive.” Additionally, “a” and “e” can be confused in words like “separate” and “definite.”

Lack of Practice

Finally, spelling mistakes can also occur simply due to a lack of practice. If we don’t regularly practice spelling words, we may forget how to spell them correctly. It’s important to make an effort to regularly practice spelling and review common spelling mistakes.

Most Commonly Misspelled Words

These are some common spelling mistakes you need to know…

Incorrect: Calender
Correct: Calendar

Incorrect: Definately
Correct: Definitely

Incorrect: Tommorrow
Correct: Tomorrow

Incorrect: Noticable
Correct: Noticeable

Incorrect: Dissappear
Correct: Disappear

Incorrect: Convinient
Correct: Convenient

Incorrect: Deterioreit
Correct: Deteriorate

Incorrect: Beggining
Correct: Beginning

Incorrect: Arguement
Correct: Argument

Incorrect: Febuary
Correct: February

Incorrect: Wensday
Correct: Wednesday

Incorrect: Ignor
Correct: Ignore

Incorrect: Occured
Correct: Occurred

Incorrect: Opertunity
Correct: Opportunity

Incorrect: Que
Correct: Queue

Incorrect: Speach
Correct: Speech

Incorrect: Thier
Correct: Their

Related  Mistakes with Adverbs: Common Grammar Mistakes in English

Incorrect: Truely
Correct: Truly

Incorrect: Twelth
Correct: Twelfth

Incorrect: Wierd
Correct: Weird

Incorrect: Sieze
Correct: Seize

Incorrect: Liesure
Correct: Leisure

Incorrect: Nieghbour
Correct: Neighbour

Incorrect: Foriegn
Correct: Foreign

Incorrect: Mispelt
Correct: Misspelt

Tricky Homophones

Affect vs. Effect

“Affect” is a verb that means to influence or produce a change in something. “Effect,” on the other hand, is a noun that refers to the result or consequence of an action. For example, “The new policy will affect our sales” and “The effect of the new policy on our sales is yet to be determined.”

Compliment vs. Complement

“Compliment” is a noun or verb that means an expression of admiration, praise, or approval. “Complement,” on the other hand, is a noun or verb that means something that completes or enhances something else. For example, “She received a compliment on her outfit” and “The red shoes complemented her dress perfectly.”

Bear vs. Bare

“Bear” is a verb that means to carry, support, or endure something. “Bare,” on the other hand, is an adjective that means uncovered or exposed. For example, “He couldn’t bear the weight of the box” and “The tree was bare of leaves in the winter.”

Its vs. It’s

“Its” is a possessive pronoun that shows ownership. “It’s,” on the other hand, is a contraction of “it is” or “it has.” For example, “The dog chased its tail” and “It’s been a long day at work.”

There vs. Their vs. They’re

“There” is an adverb that refers to a place or location. “Their” is a possessive pronoun that shows ownership. “They’re” is a contraction of “they are.” For example, “We went to the park over there” and “Their dog is so cute” and “They’re coming over for dinner tonight.”

Confusing Consonant Doubles

We’ve all been there – staring at a word, trying to figure out if it’s spelled with one or two of the same consonant. It can be a tricky thing to remember, especially when it comes to words that don’t follow the usual spelling rules. Here are some of the most commonly misspelled words with confusing consonant doubles.

One of the most frequently misspelled words is “embarrass.” It’s easy to see why – with two sets of double letters, it’s a bit of a tongue-twister. But remember, there are two Rs and two Ss in “embarrassment.” Don’t let the double letters trip you up!

Another word that often confuses people is “occurrence.” It’s tempting to spell it with just one R, but the correct spelling has two. The same goes for “accommodation” – it has two Cs and two Ms.

Related  Mistakes with Adverbs: Common Grammar Mistakes in English

When it comes to doubling consonants, it’s important to remember that not all words follow the same rules. For example, “cancel” only has one L, even though it ends in a consonant. And while “beginning” might seem like it should have two Ns, it actually only has one.

Here are some other commonly misspelled words with confusing consonant doubles:

  • “definitely” (not “definately”)
  • “separate” (not “seperate”)
  • “necessary” (not “neccessary”)
  • “parallel” (not “paralel”)

Vowel Errors

We’ve already mentioned some of the most commonly misspelled words, but one of the biggest culprits for misspellings is vowels. English has a lot of vowel sounds, and sometimes it can be difficult to remember which vowel to use in a particular word. Here are some of the most common vowel errors to watch out for:

  • “i” before “e” except after “c”: This is a common rule that many people learn in school, but it’s not always accurate. There are many exceptions to this rule, such as “weird” and “science”. So, if you’re not sure, it’s always a good idea to double-check the spelling.
  • “a” or “e” in the middle of a word: It can be difficult to remember whether a word has an “a” or an “e” in the middle. For example, “separate” is often misspelled as “seperate”. A good trick is to remember that “a rat” comes before “e” in the alphabet, so if you’re not sure, think about which letter comes first.
  • “ie” or “ei”: Another common mistake is mixing up “ie” and “ei”. For example, “believe” is often misspelled as “beleive”. A good trick is to remember the phrase “I before E, except after C, or when sounded like A, as in neighbor or weigh”.

Silent Letter Missteps

We all have those words that we just can’t seem to spell correctly, and sometimes, it’s because of those sneaky silent letters. Here are some commonly misspelled words that have silent letters:

  • Debt: This word has a silent “b” in it, so it’s spelled “debt” not “det”.
  • Knight: The “k” in “knight” is silent, so don’t forget it when you’re spelling this word.
  • Psychology: The “p” in “psychology” is silent, so it’s spelled “psychology” not “pyschology”.
  • Receipt: The “p” in “receipt” is silent, so it’s spelled “receipt” not “reciept”.
  • Wednesday: The “d” in “Wednesday” is silent, so don’t forget it when you’re spelling this word.

Incorrect Use of Apostrophes

We often see people using apostrophes incorrectly, which can lead to confusion and misunderstandings. Here are some common mistakes to avoid:

Related  Mistakes with Adverbs: Common Grammar Mistakes in English

Using Apostrophes to Make Plurals

Apostrophes should only be used to indicate possession or contraction, not to make plurals. For example, “cat’s” is possessive, while “cats” is plural. Using an apostrophe to make a plural, such as “apple’s” instead of “apples,” is incorrect.

Confusing “It’s” and “Its”

“It’s” is a contraction of “it is,” while “its” is a possessive pronoun. Many people mistakenly use an apostrophe in “its,” but this is incorrect. For example, “The cat licked its paw” is correct, while “The cat licked it’s paw” is incorrect.

Using Apostrophes with Pronouns

Apostrophes are not used with pronouns to indicate possession. For example, “yours” is possessive without an apostrophe, while “your’s” is incorrect.

Incorrect Use of Apostrophes with Acronyms

Apostrophes should not be used to make acronyms plural. For example, “CDs” is correct, while “CD’s” is incorrect.

Using Apostrophes with Dates

Apostrophes are not used to indicate a decade. For example, “the 1980s” is correct, while “the 1980’s” is incorrect.

Errors in Plurals and Possessives

One of the most frequent mistakes people make is with apostrophes. Remember, apostrophes are used to show possession, not to make a word plural. For example, “the cat’s toy” is possessive, while “the cats played” is plural.

Another common error is with irregular plurals. These are words that don’t follow the typical “add an -s” rule. For example, the plural of “child” is “children” and the plural of “mouse” is “mice”.

It’s also important to pay attention to the spelling of words that end in -y. When making these words plural, change the -y to -ies. For example, “baby” becomes “babies” and “city” becomes “cities”.

Finally, be careful with words that end in -s. When making these words possessive, add an apostrophe after the final -s. For example, “the girls’ toys” and “the buses’ schedules”.

Frequently Asked Questions

What are some frequently misspelled words?

We’ve compiled a list of some of the most commonly misspelled words to help you improve your spelling skills. Some of the words on this list include “accommodate,” “privilege,” “definitely,” and “separate.” These words can be tricky to spell, but with practice, you can master them.

Where can I find a list of commonly misspelled words?

You can find lists of commonly misspelled words online or in spelling books. YourDictionary, Merriam-Webster, and Dictionary.com are all great resources for improving your spelling skills. You can also ask your English teacher or tutor for a list of commonly misspelled words.

What is the hardest word to spell?

The hardest word to spell is subjective, as it varies from person to person. However, some of the most commonly cited difficult words to spell include “onomatopoeia,” “supercalifragilisticexpialidocious,” and “pneumonia.” Remember that with practice and patience, you can improve your spelling skills and conquer even the most difficult words.

Last Updated on November 16, 2023

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